Pianotech

  • 1.  Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 15 days ago
      |   view attached
    I have a customer with a 1991 Young Chang made Wurlitzer C153 5' with a very glossy finish, which I assume is polyester. The case is like new. A chunk, down to bare wood, was knocked out weeks ago but only recently discovered, so there is nothing to be found of the piece that came out.

    In this picture it appears larger than it is in fact. I would say it is about the size of a raisin.

    I welcome any suggestions for how to repair it that would be durable and minimize the appearance that a repair has been made. Insurance will pay for it. It is not something I would do, but for the customer, guidance for how it might be done and what kind of worker might best do it will be much appreciated.

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    David Bauguess
    Grand Junction CO
    970-257-1750
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  • 2.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 15 days ago
    Hi David:
    This is polyester finish, which is difficult to touch up to make an invisible repair.  My opinion is that the repair should be done with traditional lacquer touchup techniques.  Polyester can't be used over lacquer, so getting the high gloss using poly is not possible.  Lacquer or french polish can't make the same sheen as highly polished poly.  It's like trying to do touchup under glass or cast plastic.  Whatever is underneath the finish (wood color) will be magnified and the hue will change.  Lacquer touchup is on the surface and will hide what is underneath.  It is possible to color where the wood is missing and do a poly repair to get the glossy finish, but you'll see that it has been patched.
    All the above is my experience in working with poly for 30 years.  If there is someone who can do this kind of repair invisibly with poly, I'd like to see it and learn the technique.

    Paul McCloud

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    Paul McCloud, RPT
    Accutone Piano Service
    www.AccutonePianoService.com
    pavadasa@gmail.com
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  • 3.  RE: Repair Question

    Member
    Posted 15 days ago
    That is not an easy repair because it is on an edge plus there is the coloring and grain pattern to contend with. I would see if there is someone in your region really good at this. You can contact Allied Piano for suggestions. I know someone in North Carolina who is an expert in poly and lacquer. Trust me that the repair will not be cheap but the insurance company will want to settle quick. Get repair quotes from 3 experts. Once someone touches it they own it. Caveleri in New York are the go to guys.
    Is the damage on the lid ?

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    James Kelly
    Owner- Fur Elise Piano Service
    Pawleys Island SC
    843-325-4357
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  • 4.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 15 days ago
    From an insurance standpoint, it may need to be treated similar to auto body work, i.e. they don't do touchups but refinish the entire panel (end of story). The reason being that you CAN'T  make this an invisible repair, IOW return it to the condition it was in prior to the damage simply by touch up.

    State your position in writing and get three quotes for refinishing the entire piece including transport. Then the owners can decide what they want to do.

    Remember: insurance is in order to return the item to the condition it was on PRIOR to the damage. However, they will push to just try to fix it and be done. Don't let them bully you around. You are the expert. This is why you are hired. And get paid for it.

    Peter Grey Piano Doctor

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    Peter Grey
    Stratham NH
    603-686-2395
    pianodoctor57@gmail.com
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  • 5.  RE: Repair Question

    Member
    Posted 14 days ago
    GluBoost. Level with a fine file (broken off 2-3" end) piece.
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    Regards,

    Jon Page
    mailto:jonpage@comcast.net
    http://www.pianocapecod.com
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  • 6.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 14 days ago
    Thank you all. I've passed on your comments to the owner. (It's not a job I would do.)

    As  you can see in this picture, this will have to be a repair only to the damaged spot. If it were on the lid for example the approach might be different.



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    David Bauguess
    Grand Junction CO
    970-257-1750
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  • 7.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 14 days ago
    I thought it was a lid. Didnt realize it was a cheek.

    I showed it to someone who KNOWS polyester. He said it would be very difficult to make invisible. Gotta have lots of talent for this one.

    Peter Grey Piano Doctor

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    Peter Grey
    Stratham NH
    603-686-2395
    pianodoctor57@gmail.com
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  • 8.  RE: Repair Question

    Member
    Posted 13 days ago
    I agree- edge repairs are some of the most difficult repairs. I had a client who was an MD with a high gloss white polyester Yamaha with a chip on the half lid about the same size. I was sent to inspect the damage and give an estimate to do the repair. There are shades and tints of white and I felt it was beyond my talents. I recommended am expert in color matching but insurance went with a lower bid. That guy did the repair but in the process ruined the lid. The entire lid had to be shipped up to Cavaleri in NY to be stripped and redone.

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    James Kelly
    Owner- Fur Elise Piano Service
    Pawleys Island SC
    843-325-4357
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  • 9.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 13 days ago
    White and ivory are the most difficult colors to match.  Even if you have the polyester from the factory, you will still see the repair even after it is correctly done and polished to match.  I have successfully done a repair on a white Yamaha crushed corner (bottom of keybed on lower left corner).  I went to a local automotive paint company and had them match the color using one of the cheek blocks.  Most of these paint stores won't do color matching, but work off of a color code.  I found a place that would do it, and they did a perfect match.  The paint is loaded into aerosol cans which can only be used once because when you activate the can, the hardener is dispersed inside the can.  Any leftover paint will become hard in a very short time.  I was fortunate that the client wasn't picky, but was very happy to see the correct color.  The sheen didn't match, but it was on part of the piano that was hard to see.  If it was the fallboard, I would have had to refinish the whole thing, and perhaps even give it a topcoat.
    The location of the damage in this case, and the fact that there is color matching required, as well as graining, means it will be up to the touchup person's skill to complete the repair somewhere in the upper 90% range.  I think it is do-able to that extent, but the client should understand the practical limit of this type of repair.

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    Paul McCloud, RPT
    Accutone Piano Service
    www.AccutonePianoService.com
    pavadasa@gmail.com
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  • 10.  RE: Repair Question

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 13 days ago

    I think I recall that this damage wasn't noticed for some time, which may mean

    the owners won't be that fussy. It seems really doable to me, either with polyester

    or French polish. As long as they understand they may see it from different

    angles, or lighting, it can be done. It's all in the eye of the owner, so to speak.

    Ruth Zeiner