Voicing

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  • 1.  voicing out high partials?

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 09-23-2014 20:31
    I have a customer that recently purchased a Yamaha U3. The piano is in original but good condition. Her biggest complaint is when she plays D2 the high partial that sounds is driving her crazy. I can hear it to some extent on surrounding notes but this one is the one she hears the most. She is a enthusiastic but beginning level player. Any ideas on how to reduce this overtone she is hearing. I told her that I would check with the voicing Yodas and see what I could learn thanks. Michael Crosby Kennesaw GA 770-309-1585 -------------------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: voicing out high partials?

    Posted 09-23-2014 20:40
    Very careful single needling close to but not on the striking point by the point of the hammer that hits the offending string should take care of it. Angle towards the molding. Good luck! ------------------------------------------- Andrew Saderman Forest Hills NY 718-263-6508 -------------------------------------------


  • 3.  RE: voicing out high partials?

    Posted 09-23-2014 21:00

    Whoops,  wrong note. Please disregard.  Tony

    On 24/09/2014 10:39 am, "Andrew Saderman via Piano Technicians Guild" < Mail@connectedcommunity.org > wrote:
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    RE: voicing out high partials?  
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  • 4.  RE: voicing out high partials?

    Posted 09-23-2014 20:54
    Possibly the sound is coming from the capo bar. Rough bar ??

    Tony

    On 24/09/2014 10:30 AM, Michael Crosby via Piano Technicians Guild wrote:
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  • 5.  RE:voicing out high partials?

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 09-23-2014 21:23
    I had a similar situation on a Yamaha C2 about 12 years years ago. I was still a little "green" at voicing at that time and the piano was brand new--I worked for the dealer so I called Tech support at Yamaha. The tech advised me to insert a fairly small diameter single needle straight into the crown, right into the string marks-- about 3 times should do it he said, into each offending hammer. (Depth was about 7 to 8 mm if I remember correctly). I realize this is a U3, and may not be exactly the same issue. Mine was EXTREMELY bright & was making a really offending sound when playing MF & louder. It worked like a charm for my situation. It is my belief (after years of trial & error) that Yamaha hammers are just different animals. You might try inserting the single needle only ONCE and just see what it does. Proceed with caution! I would not rule out calling yourself if it's still in Warranty just to double check with them. This procedure should only be done in rare situations but it DOES have it's place and this could be one of those times.
    My 2 cents- best!!
    Kevin Fortenberry

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    Kevin Fortenberry
    Registered Piano Technician
    Lubbock TX
    806-778-3962
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  • 6.  RE: voicing out high partials?

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 09-23-2014 21:36
    Hold the one or two layers of a handkerchief between the hammer and the string and play the note. If that gives a desired change, proceed with needling. If not, the problem is elsewhere. ------------------------------------------- Ed Sutton Editor Piano Technicians Journal ed440@me.com 704-536-7926 -------------------------------------------


  • 7.  RE: voicing out high partials?

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 09-23-2014 22:26
    As a first step, I like to check mating: with pedal down, press the hammer very lightly on the strings, using a finger on the shank (finger resting on the hammer rail, for control). Pluck the strings and see if one is more open than the other. File the hammer on the side that is more muted until both sound equally muted. Whether or not this is the cause of the problem, mating will give the note better focus, less "junk" in the sound, a more steady rise in tone color when playing with added force.

    If I decide I do want to voice the hammer, I would start by playing the note with each string muted in turn, to see if one is more of a problem than the other. I would probably use a single needle, inserted very close to the center of the crown, angled into the hammer away from the top of the core. I am trying to maintain a triangle of untouched felt above the top of the core molding, something like 60º, so the angle of the insertion is in reference to that. I generally use single needle in one of those fairly cheap voicing tools that can pivot for this kind of thing. You can usually angle it so as to do top and bottom of the hammer.

    Start with one insertion on either side of the middle of one string groove, listen. Possibly 2 - 3 insertions on either side of both string grooves would be about as much as I would do. 5 - 7 mm deep (deeper as you move out from the middle). It would partly depend on what I felt in the hammer felt: is it quite hard, resistant to the insertion? Is the problem mostly just attack sound? If this is so, some very shallow needling (2 - 3 mm) right in the grooves might help.

    Whatever you are doing, play the notes around it to compare.

    Another thing to consider is mismatched strings (not likely to lead to this particular complaint, but maybe), and the possibility that there is a longitudinal mode issue. If the latter, it will be a sound in an individual string, and it will go away as you tune it up or down by up to 50¢. I don't think so on a U3, but it is a good thing to bear in mind for similar problems with other pianos.

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    Fred Sturm
    University of New Mexico
    http://fredsturm.net
    "When I smell a flower, I don't think about how it was cultivated. I like to listen to music the same way." -Federico Mompou
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