Discussion Posts

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    if you post some pictures you might catch a fish . there is probably someone out there hoarding these things... check with Isaac Sidgursy or even with Hailun ------------------------------ James Kelly Owner- Fur Elise Piano Service Pawleys Island SC ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I would not add hardener to these hammers. If it's just a bit under it will develop with some playing. You can try setting the felt with a small hammer (combo tool type) setting the tails on a support block. Just be sure the tails aren't too thin and ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Floyd, If you have access to a key pounder, you can peer in to the (played-in) future. I acquired a pounder (from Chris Brown, RPT) for the purpose of playing in new parts quickly and evenly, facilitating a more stable regulation by the time the pianist ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I agree, Geoff, but it's always nice to have somewhere to go when a change in humidity subtly changes the dimensions of the key bed or the key frame.  If there is some wiggle room in the final placement of the glides, I would sooner choose a point from ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    > "... will just have to settle for the one place where everything works..." I think this should be the goal no matter where the manufacturer starts, or what the manufacturer recommends.  ------------------------------ Geoff Sykes, RPT Los Angeles ...

  • Posted in: CAUT

    What size are the tuning pins ?  No to putting in 3 in 1 , WD 40 etc you will ruin the pinblock . If the block is to be replaced that will not matter too much. You can try using a small butane torch to heat the pin . Be careful using an impact wrench/drill ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Interesting.  I have just installed my first set of Renner Blue Points.  The piano is a Yamaha CF, c. 1988.  I did a minimal amount of low shoulder pre-needling, as per the Renner protocol.  Without much play-in yet, the result is overly mellow, though ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Thank you, David, for your thoughts and interpretations on our little world of hammers. I thought I would address your many points one by one, but decided not to. I "get" all of your concerns, and take them seriously. I will reply to this in my own way ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I'm starting a new thread, based on ideas put forth in a thread a couple of days ago, titled Yamaha regulation/voicing problems. In that thread, Geoff Sykes cites instructions from Yamaha to have, as a point of beginning, glide bolts extending beyond ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I'm working on an older Yamaha G5 - ca. 1962 - which lacks glide bolts. I forget what the optimum approach is to bedding this kind of key frame. Suggested procedure? Thanks! ------------------------------ Patrick Draine Billerica MA 978-663-9690 --- ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I have considered developing a new hammer for some time. I did some research into the earlier felt making process that was used in the 19th century. All of the processes used from the beginning to the end have a cumulative effect on the resiliency and ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I agree with Jim on this one. Hit them with a hammer to break the bond then try backing them out. You may need to invest in a more powerful drill though, which you'll find a million uses for when doing this type of work. . . . . . . . . . . . ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Robert We had a great Southeast Seminar last night presented by Don Mannino. Those under lever capstans are for adjusting the timing of the damper lift by the key end, not the damper tray.  I know that doesn't hep you in your search, but it might ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Remove the keybed  (phillips screws around it's perimeter).  It's not glued in place.  Turn the piano over on a pile of moving blankets.  Pound the t-pins out from underneath.  BTW, use an appropriately sized phillips bit or you'll bugger up the screw ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Great! In these cases where much needling was performed, it would be prudent for your long term relationship with the client, to let them know, that further needling will be needed, constantly. Often, in a case like what you successfully performed yesterday, ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    The block and any wood/felt will have to be replaced because you will not be able to get the stench. Lingering odor is very offensive and will not be tolerated by anyone, not even a cat lover. ------------------------------ Regards, Jon Page mailto:jonpage@comcast.net ...

  • Posted in: CAUT

    Hi Scott, Heat from a torch on the pin might free them up. Doug Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Put your tuning pin socket on a 3/4” drive breaker bar. If you need more leverage you can slip a long pipe over the end of the breaker bar. You might want to douse the pins with liquid wrench first. That block is going to stink of cat pee and needs ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Lloyd, "because we have so many sales we must be the best" Is a fallacious argument. It is often referred to as the bandwagon fallacy. In other words, if everybody's doing it it must be right. The truth of the matter is that you have some excellent hammers ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Yes, I would guess the block is toast, how many pins are so affected?  Can't you pull the plate on a Yamaha with the block still attached? If so, perhaps you could separate the plate from the block with the pins still in position. Otherwise, per Roger's ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    A few thoughts come to mind. I believe there are places in Europe where one can have new felt applied to the original cores. Not sure about the why or how of this but it's certainly a different approach if they are making the hammers one at a time. It ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I think we shouldn't lose perspective. There were very few "hate" comments directed toward Renner. Most comments, including my own, acknowledged the quality of Renner parts and the accommodations of the principles. I contribute many thousands of dollars ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Scott, I'm sure the pin block is toast. Jim's suggestion to pound them out from underneath may be your only option. Problem is, you can't get a good swing from inside the action cavity. You're in luck. You can easily remove the key bed on Yamaha pianos. ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    All, Thank you so much for your input!  I did the job yesterday. The customer was fully satisfied! And I too agree now that Blue points are a great choice for a Baldwin. I had to needle the he** out of them though. Still feeling it in my arm!  They ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Seems to me that it probably does need replacing. And if it's marginal to begin with, using heat to free the pins per various suggestions might be its last gasp.

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I mean if I ruin the block any further...it may well need replacing. ------------------------------ Scott Cole, RPT rvpianotuner.com Talent, OR (541-601-9033 ------------------------------

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Thanks guys, I may try banging a couple in first, possibly some heat. I wasn't really serious about using any liquids--won't help to get the pins out if I ruin the block. ------------------------------ Scott Cole, RPT rvpianotuner.com Talent, OR (541-601-9033 ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Here's a magnetic induction heater which might be used to heat tuning pins: Magnetic Induction Heater Kit: https://www.ebay.com/itm/324461705465?hash=item4b8b6cb8f9:g:Z20AAOSwvBRgUWkC About $200. Used in automotive industry to heat frozen bolts. ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Tom, It's my understanding that Ray is seeking to retire. He supposedly had an apprentice, however it seems to me that an opportunity exists right there for you if you're serious. Facilities, training, reputation, existing business...perhaps not exactly ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Re the actual pressing, it seems to me, that the Dolge presses where used at that period of time. Might be able to scare one up...I know David Stanwood had one once...not sure where it went. He was considering making hammers at one time, but gave it up ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Plus, there are problems of gluing adhesion when you get into the harder woods.  A viable alternative to explore is Ash. It has the highest strength to weight ratio of all the hardwoods. Its janka hardness is similar to Hard rock Maple(1400lb). Ronsen ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Given the cat pee, I assume you will be replacing the block...no? ------------------------------ Jim Ialeggio grandpianosolutions.com Shirley, MA 978 425-9026 ------------------------------

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Take a pneumatic palm nailer, make a slug to fit in the pin hole from inside the cavity, and blast the pin up and out from the bottom of the block. You just need to break the corrosion bond, and it will move. If you don't have a palm nailer, try banging ...

  • Posted in: CAUT

    A square socket will be better than a star for staying on the pin - if you can find one that fits whatever tool you have. Tap the pins down with a sledge and punch to break them free. (Support the block while doing so). Apply heat to the pins, ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    I think, from what I have seen of bamboo laminated boards, that they dampen vibrations somewhat. I could be wrong about that, but I did buy a slab of bamboo years ago, thinking of using it for a bridge root. I bagged the idea, after I saw that the beam ...

  • Posted in: CAUT

    Hi Scott What size motor is on your drill? I used a horse drill for most of my pin removals, but I recently bought a horse, and it takes out pins with over 180 torque. The other suggestion is a large ratchet wrench with the tuning tip. ...

  • Posted in: CAUT

    Two suggestions:  Do you have a tuning pin socket that fits on a torque wrench, with the 3/8" square drive?  That will allow you to use a breaker bar, with a pipe on the end of it, if needed, for extra leverage.  Increased risk of pin breakage, of course.  ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Heat? Some kind of monster zapper to run current through the pin? Clamp a hair straightener on the pin(s)? Heat gun? That's where I'd start. If you're going to keep the block, I would avoid anything anything in it like WD40 or any oil product because ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Greetings all, I'm in a bit of a pickle. Likely just the tip of the pickle, as it were. I have a Yamaha G2 in the shop for a restring and cleanup. It looks like a pack of cats had inhabited it. The strings were extremely corroded, and there are bubbles ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Oops, I meant to add a couple of things. Giving credit where credit is due, the Grierson Steinway B referenced in my last post has a Baldassin soundboard. Also, my somewhat lengthy technical outline of needling Renner hammers departs a bit from ...

    1 person recommends this.
  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Jim Ialeggio mentioned several issues so I'll briefly summarize those from his post and reply to each: Thread hijacked for sales : this thread began as a sales pitch by a fan of another piano hammer maker.  I've simply provided facts about our products, ...

    1 person recommends this.
  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Yes, this is another of my long-winded posts, but I feel it is necessary. This post includes two sections. The My Take is my sense of the direction this thread has taken, and the Technical section proposes a brief but necessary how-to on working with ...

    1 person recommends this.
  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Benjamin, Thanks for contributing. As a practicing RPT, you certainly have my respect when you say something. As far as hate mail against Renner goes. Yes that would be wrong. This forum is not for denigrating entities like Renner. I'm not here to criticize ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Ed McMorrow, I appreciate your comments and your contribution to the knowledge base on this issue. I have been taught some of your techniques by one of your protégés and it has helped me restore these great old American pianos and give them back their ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    When rebuilding a fine golden age American piano or those extending into the mid-20th Century using those designs, you can't use these heavy hammers without adding lead or bastardizing the action geometry. That's my point. So wouldn't it be nice to have ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Tom, You asked for independent technicians to offer their opinions. I'll offer mine. I've put multiple types of hammers on many kinds of pianos over the years. My personal favorites are Renners. I like the results they produce, especially on Steinways. ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    2021 Convention & Technical Institute August 4 - 7 Orlando, FL convention.ptg.org Grow Your Business Expand Your Skills   Service & Repair Tuning & ETDs Action Regulation Rebuilding & Shop Voicing & ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Know that I think about it, I think they are called a pilot screw. ------------------------------ Robert Callaghan Reno NV 775-287-2140 ------------------------------

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Hello.  I've been looking for a source for an adjusting capstan that goes on the bottom of a damper underlever to adjust the lift by the damper lift rail.  They are very delicate and when I tried to turn one it broke off.  It is the kind of damper flange ...

  • Posted in: Pianotech

    Abel does. ------------------------------ William Truitt Bridgewater NH 603-744-2277 ------------------------------