Pianotech

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String lifters

  • 1.  String lifters

    Posted 7 days ago
    As an aspiring technician, I would like to know if one should use a different string lifter/spacer for a grand piano vs. an upright.

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    Scot Irvine
    Music Teacher
    San Gabriel Ca
    626-972-1315
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  • 2.  RE: String lifters

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 7 days ago
    Hi Scot:
    I don't think there's much difference as far as the function. Both have crowded groups of tuning pins. The only thing I'll mention is that some of these string lifters have to be modified a bit because the tines are too fat. I usually grind them thinner at the end so they'll fit easier between the pins.
    My opinion only.
    Paul McCloud
    San Diego



    Scot Irvine
    As an aspiring technician, I would like to know if one should use a different string lifter/spacer for a grand piano vs. an upright.

    ------------------------------
    Scot Irvine
    Music Teacher
    San Gabriel Ca
    626-972-1315
    ------------------------------

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  • 3.  RE: String lifters

    Registered Piano Technician
    Posted 7 days ago
    Scott, the primary job of the string lifter is raise the coil so it is snug against the becket and squared to the pin without damaging the finish on the plate. Whatever works best for you is the way to go. Over the years I have gravitated away from the lifter/spacer to the tool that has a lifter at one end and hook at the other but YMMV. Levering the lifter against the plate often leads to finish damage. I also often find myself using a flat screwdriver for this, I can brace against the plate bushing and avoid the plate entirely. Making good coils in the first place facilitates getting a nice tight finished coil.

    If you have a chance to completely restring a piano you'll get quite good at making nice tight coils and manipulating the tuning pins as well.

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    Steven Rosenthal
    Honolulu HI
    808-521-7129
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  • 4.  RE: String lifters

    Posted 7 days ago
    Thanks, I'm thinking about using a crank and a dummy pin to make tight coils. Is that a good idea? How big should the dummy pin be for a #2 pin?
    ​​​

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    Scot Irvine
    Music Teacher
    San Gabriel Ca
    626-972-1315
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  • 5.  RE: String lifters

    Member
    Posted 6 days ago
    A #2 pin. Cut the pin off 8-10mm below the hole. Cut up into the hole to create a channel for the coil to slip off. Treble wire can be transferred with a pair of needle-nosed pliers but thicker bass core needs to have the coil expanded a bit. To do this, remove the coil from the dummy pin and replace it back on upside-down, This way the becket is closer to the end of the pin. With a screw driver, pry the becket slightly away from the pin, not too far, just enough to be able to get the coil in the piano without Herculean effort. This will facilitate the transfer ​to the piano. I leave the dummy pin jammed into a string crank in my field string case.

    As for a coil lifter, a string hook is better. You can fabricate one from a screw driver. Don't bend the shank to create the hook, cut into it with a Dremel cut-off wheel.

    For consistent beckets, The Becket tool insures even consistent becket position

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    Regards,

    Jon Page
    mailto:jonpage@comcast.net
    http://www.pianocapecod.com
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  • 6.  RE: String lifters

    Posted 6 days ago
    Thanks Jon, good advice.

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    Scot Irvine
    Music Teacher
    San Gabriel Ca
    626-972-1315
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